Afrique21.tv logo
Subscribe to the Afrique21.tv newsletter




 
Favoris et Partage

If your mind is made up to go and live in Portuguese-speaking Africa, this programme is for you! Thanks to our guests, you'll be able to discover all the attractions of the two main countries in this region, but as nothing is ever completely rosy you'll also be able to learn more about some of the problems you may face in Angola and Mozambique. Let's start this programme with some good news and that concerns the way French people are generally welcomed in this part of Africa.

Lydia Picoteiro Bettencourt
The French are warmly welcomed in Portuguese-speaking Africa. I suppose you could say they’re curious, curious in their willingness to chat and share and also curious to learn what's happening in France, to talk to you, and to reveal some of their interpersonal skills and customs because Portuguese-speaking culture is particularly pleasant, with a sort of richness and dialogue between individuals, and I’ll round off with a term which doesn't exist in French, known as "morabeza", which is a social skill found in Cape Verde for example, and involves passing on your culture to a foreigner, whether this is a French person or someone of another nationality.

So, you can expect a warm welcome, but nevertheless there are some precautions to be taken, particularly in terms of security and more specifically in Luanda in Angola

Didier Colignon
What about security?
Where the security situation is concerned, you need to be careful in Luanda. I'd say the rules are pretty simple, you should travel around by car, and to begin with travel with a driver because you're not familiar with the city and driving behaviour. You should avoid walking around, that's the first thing. I'd say that between eight in the morning in five in the afternoon, you're fairly safe in the centre but afterwards you need to be very careful, particularly on the Luanda / Talatona road where there are regularly lots of traffic jams and where attacks are frequent, with a tendency towards violence, particularly in the street where they are trying to steal your wallet, your computer or your telephones, etc., so it's pretty intimidating with firearms and knives being brandished, it’s quite violent and then there's also the risk of attacks and assaults in your home and that's why most homes are located in what are referred to as condominiums, with security guards, but if you’re not in one of these there’s always the possibility to have 2 or 3 armed guards in front of your house to dissuade ill-intentioned individuals.

In Mozambique, and particularly in Maputo, you are also advised by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs to be very cautious as armed robberies are frequent there, particularly when you're on foot and haven’t removed any valuables you may be carrying, but Mozambique is felt to be more secure than Angola, with the exception of a few areas such as the provinces of Manica, Sofala and the southern provinces of Zambezia and Tete controlled by the opposition party RENAMO.
Another problem in Angola is the cost of living.... Described as one of the world's most expensive cities by various studies including the annual Mercer survey, you'll need plenty of money to live in Luanda.

Didier Colignon
The cost of living in Luanda
The cost of living is extremely high and I believe that in the rankings drawn up by Mercer, Luanda is still up there with New York, Tokyo or Hong Kong so it's very expensive. If you're living in an apartment complex with 2 to 3 bedrooms in a relatively safe area, you need to plan on a rent of $10,000 per month. Most of the food is imported so it's very expensive as it needs to be brought in by aircraft or boat. There are now local alternatives which have developed out of necessity but living costs are still expensive because structurally on the one hand you have very little local production so everything is imported and also at one time purchasing power was high so prices soared. This has calmed down a bit but it still remains a very expensive city. It won't be the world's expensive city this year but it’s definitely up there in the top 10 most expensive places to live.

Security and the cost of living in Luanda are definitely problematic but Angola and its capital city nevertheless reserve some pleasant surprises including a magnificent bay perfect for physical activities, an impressive nightlife and some little-known surfing spots just 40 or so kilometres away not to mention attractive provinces with mountains, waterfalls, the sea and the desert. And Mozambique certainly isn’t left out in this respect either, as its beauty has been described as unbelievable by some travel agencies, with the result being that the tourism industry is constantly expanding there.

If you arrive in Angola with your children, you have several options for their schooling

Didier Colignon
Concerning education, there’s the Angolan public education system, which may not be exactly what you're looking for, but as far as alternatives go there’s the French lycée where the standards are very high as it meets the French national education standards. You also have the Portuguese school which also offers a high standard and then you have private schools which offer more of an Anglo-Saxon educational experience, including the American School and other schools which teach children up to the IB diploma recognised in the UK, so there are a few alternatives but these alternatives can be quite expensive because for a year there you need to plan on between $15 to $25,000 per child to register your children excluding extracurricular activities.

In Mozambique you can school your children at the French Gustave Eiffel Lycée in Maputo or in the state sector. The teaching and learning of French is constantly expanding and since the reform of the secondary education system which came into effect in 2009, French is taught as an option from the 9th year onwards (equivalent to the 3rd year in France).

There's one last point we should stress... concerning health

Lydia Picoteiro Bettencourt
In Angola you may also encounter problems with the health system. I'm not talking about shortages of medicines but the total absence of certain medicines in what is still a very basic health system. Don't forget that the country is 42 years old, which means that the country has been independent for 42 years. Mozambique has experienced more than 20 years of civil war so some sectors still need to be developed to hopefully attract investors looking to set up laboratories, to manufacture medicines to provide better access to health care for those Angolans who can afford it, and who are currently often forced to go to Portugal to obtain the medicines or treatment they require.

You now know the main things you need if you are planning to go and live in Mozambique or Angola, but if you want more information feel free to listen to feedback from our experts and contacts in the section provided for them.


Video content: If your mind is made up to go and live in Portuguese-speaking Africa, this programme is for you! Thanks to our guests, you'll be able to discover all the attractions of the two main countries in this region, but as nothing is ever completely rosy you'll also be able to learn more about some of the problems you may face in Angola and Mozambique.
Let's start this programme with some good news and that concerns the way French people are generally welcomed in this part of Africa.

Lydia Picoteiro Bettencourt
The French are warmly welcomed in Portuguese-speaking Africa. I suppose you could say they’re curious, curious in their willingness to chat and share and also curious to learn what's happening in France, to talk to you, and to reveal some of their interpersonal skills and customs because Portuguese-speaking culture is particularly pleasant, with a sort of richness and dialogue between individuals, and I’ll round off with a term which doesn't exist in French, known as "morabeza", which is a social skill found in Cape Verde for example, and involves passing on your culture to a foreigner, whether this is a French person or someone of another nationality.

So, you can expect a warm welcome, but nevertheless there are some precautions to be taken, particularly in terms of security and more specifically in Luanda in Angola

Didier Colignon
What about security?
Where the security situation is concerned, you need to be careful in Luanda. I'd say the rules are pretty simple, you should travel around by car, and to begin with travel with a driver because you're not familiar with the city and driving behaviour. You should avoid walking around, that's the first thing. I'd say that between eight in the morning in five in the afternoon, you're fairly safe in the centre but afterwards you need to be very careful, particularly on the Luanda / Talatona road where there are regularly lots of traffic jams and where attacks are frequent, with a tendency towards violence, particularly in the street where they are trying to steal your wallet, your computer or your telephones, etc., so it's pretty intimidating with firearms and knives being brandished, it’s quite violent and then there's also the risk of attacks and assaults in your home and that's why most homes are located in what are referred to as condominiums, with security guards, but if you’re not in one of these there’s always the possibility to have 2 or 3 armed guards in front of your house to dissuade ill-intentioned individuals.

In Mozambique, and particularly in Maputo, you are also advised by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs to be very cautious as armed robberies are frequent there, particularly when you're on foot and haven’t removed any valuables you may be carrying, but Mozambique is felt to be more secure than Angola, with the exception of a few areas such as the provinces of Manica, Sofala and the southern provinces of Zambezia and Tete controlled by the opposition party RENAMO.
Another problem in Angola is the cost of living.... Described as one of the world's most expensive cities by various studies including the annual Mercer survey, you'll need plenty of money to live in Luanda.

Didier Colignon
The cost of living in Luanda
The cost of living is extremely high and I believe that in the rankings drawn up by Mercer, Luanda is still up there with New York, Tokyo or Hong Kong so it's very expensive. If you're living in an apartment complex with 2 to 3 bedrooms in a relatively safe area, you need to plan on a rent of $10,000 per month. Most of the food is imported so it's very expensive as it needs to be brought in by aircraft or boat. There are now local alternatives which have developed out of necessity but living costs are still expensive because structurally on the one hand you have very little local production so everything is imported and also at one time purchasing power was high so prices soared. This has calmed down a bit but it still remains a very expensive city. It won't be the world's expensive city this year but it’s definitely up there in the top 10 most expensive places to live.

Security and the cost of living in Luanda are definitely problematic but Angola and its capital city nevertheless reserve some pleasant surprises including a magnificent bay perfect for physical activities, an impressive nightlife and some little-known surfing spots just 40 or so kilometres away not to mention attractive provinces with mountains, waterfalls, the sea and the desert. And Mozambique certainly isn’t left out in this respect either, as its beauty has been described as unbelievable by some travel agencies, with the result being that the tourism industry is constantly expanding there.

If you arrive in Angola with your children, you have several options for their schooling

Didier Colignon
Concerning education, there’s the Angolan public education system, which may not be exactly what you're looking for, but as far as alternatives go there’s the French lycée where the standards are very high as it meets the French national education standards. You also have the Portuguese school which also offers a high standard and then you have private schools which offer more of an Anglo-Saxon educational experience, including the American School and other schools which teach children up to the IB diploma recognised in the UK, so there are a few alternatives but these alternatives can be quite expensive because for a year there you need to plan on between $15 to $25,000 per child to register your children excluding extracurricular activities.

In Mozambique you can school your children at the French Gustave Eiffel Lycée in Maputo or in the state sector. The teaching and learning of French is constantly expanding and since the reform of the secondary education system which came into effect in 2009, French is taught as an option from the 9th year onwards (equivalent to the 3rd year in France).

There's one last point we should stress... concerning health

Lydia Picoteiro Bettencourt
In Angola you may also encounter problems with the health system. I'm not talking about shortages of medicines but the total absence of certain medicines in what is still a very basic health system. Don't forget that the country is 42 years old, which means that the country has been independent for 42 years. Mozambique has experienced more than 20 years of civil war so some sectors still need to be developed to hopefully attract investors looking to set up laboratories, to manufacture medicines to provide better access to health care for those Angolans who can afford it, and who are currently often forced to go to Portugal to obtain the medicines or treatment they require.

You now know the main things you need if you are planning to go and live in Mozambique or Angola, but if you want more information feel free to listen to feedback from our experts and contacts in the section provided for them.


Linked key words: everyday life, Africa, Africa Lusophone, security, Angola, Mozambique, Luanda

Image for social networks:
 
 
 
 
   

 

Contact Us 
 Afrique21.tv accepts no liability for the content of advertisements and videos broadcast on www.afrique21.tv